Physical Therapy is Better Than PRP for Shoulder Impingement

Being passive is sometimes nice.

It can help to avoid fights, allow for rest, and can be an efficient way to descend stairs.

Sometimes in medicine passive interventions can be valuable as well.

I've had many patients that have made a ton of progress because of passive intervention.

Hip patients that have no pain after dry needling, shoulder patients that can move without pain after kinesiotaping, and neck patients that can turn their head with ease after some manual techniques.

But that only really creates a window.  A window for an opportunity to get better with ACTIVE therapy.  

My patients don't get better because of the passive treatment.  They get better because of what happens after - movement and exercise.

 Sometimes without a passive "reset" trying to get better feels like a window you can't get through ( image source )

Sometimes without a passive "reset" trying to get better feels like a window you can't get through (image source)

New Study

A new study confirms this common clinical evidence.

The authors randomized 62 subjects with shoulder impingement into two groups: one to a PRP injection group and the other to an exercise therapy group.

At 1, 3, and 6 month follow ups the exercise group out performed the PRP (Platelet-Rich Plasma) group.  They had less pain and better function.

Summary

If your door hinges broke down and it wouldn't close, would you inject it with WD40?  Or would you try to help restore optimal mechanics?

Like with many home improvement projects, the best intervention is the active one.

Next time you have shoulder pain, find a physical therapist and get active!